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Hsu and doc student Conklin publish paper

Dr. YU-CHANG HSU

Dr. YU-CHANG HSU

EdTech Associate Professor Yu-Chang Hsu co-published an article titled “Using importance-performance analysis to guide instructional design of experiential learning activities” in Online Learning Journal.

He wrote the article with EdTech doctoral student Sheri Conklin, and Judy Kinney, an assistant professor at University of North Carolina Greensboro.

There is limited research on experiential learning in online courses as well as empirical data to assist with the instructional design of the experiential learning activities.

The primary goal of this exploratory study is to demonstrate the use of importance-performance analysis to guide instructional design of experiential learning activities in an online introduction to criminology course.

A long drive, but worth it.

Colin Stapp (Oregon) visits with Professor Kerry Rice at a reception following Boise State's commencement Dec. 17. Stapp is one of more than 40 EdTech grads at this fall's commencement.

Colin Stapp (Oregon) visits with Professor Kerry Rice at a reception following Boise State’s commencement Dec. 17. Stapp, one of more than 40 EdTech grads at this fall’s commencement, drove to Boise from Salem, Oregon, just before winter storms closed all highways.

Rob Breit travels from Chicago

Rob Breit (Illinois) enjoys a chat with one of his professors at the post-commencement reception Dec. 17.  His mother is shown at left.

Rob Breit (Illinois) enjoys a chat with one of his professors at the post-commencement reception Dec. 17. His mother is shown at left.

Two reasons why Boise State EdTech is nation’s largest

New master's students Beverly McKay (Idaho) and Jeanne Bennett (California) pause for a picture at Boise State University's 99th commencement. McKay and Bennett are part of the reason why Boise State EdTech remains the nation's largest graduate program in educational technology.

New master’s students Beverly McKay (Idaho) and Jeanne Bennett (California) pause for a picture at Boise State University’s 99th commencement. McKay and Bennett are part of the reason why Boise State EdTech remains the nation’s largest graduate program in educational technology.

It was a banner day for EdTech’s Hannah Clark

EdTech master's graduate Hannah Clark (Idaho) had the honor of carrying the Graduate College banner at commencement on Dec. 17. Banner bearers lead all graduates of each college into Taco Bell Arena for the ceremony.  All graduate students (regardless of academic discipline) are seated in the Graduate College section.

EdTech master’s graduate Hannah Clark (Idaho) had the honor of carrying the Graduate College banner at commencement on Dec. 17. Banner bearers lead all graduates of each college into Taco Bell Arena for the ceremony. All graduate students (regardless of academic discipline) are seated in the Graduate College section.

Ohhhh, Glori

Doctoral graduate Glori Hinck poses for a picture with Associate Professor Patrick Lowenthal at the post-commencement open house, Saturday, Dec. 17.

Doctoral graduate Glori Hinck poses for a picture with Associate Professor Patrick Lowenthal at the post-commencement open house, Saturday, Dec. 17.

Professor and grad share a laugh

EdTech Chair Brett Shelton shares a laugh with doctoral graduate Carol Askin at the after-commencement reception, Saturday, Dec. 17.

EdTech Chair Brett Shelton shares a laugh with doctoral graduate Carol Askin at the after-commencement reception, Saturday, Dec. 17.

EdTech hoods two new doctoral graduates

EdTech hooded two new doctoral graduates at Boise State University's 99th commencement ceremony Saturday, Dec. 17. Carol Askin (left) is a California elementary school teacher, and Glori Hinck (right) works at a university in Minnesota. Here, they posed for a photo with EdTech Doctoral Program Director Ross Perkins at the post-commencement reception.

EdTech hooded two new doctoral graduates at Boise State University’s 99th commencement ceremony Saturday, Dec. 17. Carol Askin (left) is a California elementary school teacher, and Glori Hinck (right) works at a university in Minnesota. Here, they posed for a photo with EdTech Doctoral Program Director Ross Perkins at the post-commencement reception.

How tech may influence the next campaign

PETER DIAMANDIS

PETER DIAMANDIS

Re-published from LinkedIn. Peter Diamandis is vice-chairman of Human Longevity.

If you think this election was insane, wait until 2020.

I want you to imagine how, in four years’ time, technologies like AI, machine learning, sensors and networks will accelerate.

Political campaigns are about to get hyper-personalized, thanks to advances in a few exponential technologies.

Imagine a candidate who now knows everything about you, who can reach you wherever you happen to be looking, and who can use info scraped from social media (and intuited by machine learning algorithms) to speak directly to you and your interests.

Here’s what future election campaign marketing might feel like…

Key Trends: In Just 4 Years…

1. Social media will continue to explode.

In 2016, 78% of Americans have a social media profile. This year, 162 million Americans (over 50%) will log onto Facebook at least once a month.

In four years, these numbers will continue to explode. And so will a campaign’s knowledge about you, what you care about and who you are.

AI agents built by political campaigns will stalk your every move, scraping your social graph, reading your tweets and posts, analyzing your Instagram photos… mining your publicly available data to know more about you than ever before.

The single most important factor influencing your voting decision is your social network… so you can bet that political campaigns will be mining this data to find your top social influencers, what stories you’re reading, and subjects that resonate with you.

2. Machine Learning/AI will move forward 10x.

This year, we saw chatbots emerge in a big way. Since they opened the platform, Facebook Messenger now has 11,000+ chatbots, where an algorithm communicates with end users over Messenger as if it were a person. These are clunky at best.

By 2020, things are going to get much more sophisticated. Voice interfaces like Siri, Cortana, Google and Alexa are going to get much, much better.

You’ll be able to carry out in-depth conversations with these AIs, and thanks to machine learning and the exponentially increasing amount of data about yourself that you’re generating each year, these AIs will learn how to optimally communicate with you in such a personalized fashion that you’d swear it’s your closest friend. They’ll incorporate your ideologies, preferences, choice linguistic styles and slang, favorite topics and content, and even inside jokes into the conversation.

It’s going to get personal…

3. 50 billion devices & 1 trillion sensors will come online.

IoT is exploding exponentially, and we’ll see billions of devices connected to the Web and interacting with you on a daily basis.

Your cars, your AR glasses, your computing devices, your biometric sensors, your home, your office, your appliances, restaurants, grocery stores, airports, planes and everything in between will be connected and communicating with each other.

Are voters who exercise frequently better Republican donors? An AI can pick up on your movements, track your phone, and perhaps even monitor your heart rate.

Ubiquitous cameras throughout our environment will be imaging everything, everywhere. Imagine passing by a sidewalk display where the cameras and machine learning protocols pick up your face, know exactly who you are and feed you a personalized advertisement.

Spooky? Perhaps, but this kind of hyper-focused, targeted advertising is on its way.

4. Digital avatars will become photorealistic and fully programmable.

In four years, we’ll be able to fully manipulate photorealistic avatars of candidates to say, well… anything.

This year, researchers out of Stanford were able to take videos of humans and, in real-time, manipulate their faces to match expressions of another person in the lab. Scary.

(Face2Face: Real-time Face Capture and Reenactment of RGB Videos)

By the next election, this is going to get even better. We’ll be able to render any face to do and say anything, and you won’t be able to tell it’s fake.

Add this to advances in algorithmic audio dubbing, and we’ll be able to type text into a program which will then spit it out in the exact voice of the presidential candidate.

5. Micropayments, Smart Objects, and Blockchain applications will go mainstream.

In four years, it’s going to get easier and easier to pay for things. Mobile payments in 2016 will amount to over $600 billion. In 2020, this will likely be over $1 trillion.

More than that, we’ll see a proliferation of apps that use “micro-payments” — small payments, from a fraction of a cent to just a few dollars, built on digital protocols like the Blockchain.

You’ll be able to “flick” digital objects that contain value — like a Digital Political Sticker (which you bought for $0.05) with your face on it — as endorsements to candidates from your phone to their smart billboards.

And while I doubt the regulatory environment will move quickly enough for the next election, eventually Blockchain will allow us to vote in the election from our own devices.

Hyper-personalized Political Ads: What it will feel like…

The bottom line is that the 2020 election is going to get very personal.

Imagine candidate advertisements that are so personalized that they are scary in their accuracy and timeliness.

For Example: Imagine I’m walking down the street to my local coffee shop, and a photorealistic avatar of the presidential candidate on the bus stop advertisement I pass turns to me and says:

“Hi Peter, I’m running for president. I know you have two 5-year old boys going to kindergarten at XYZ School. Do you know that my policy means that we’ll be cutting tuition in half for you? That means you’ll immediately save $10,000 if you vote for me…”

If you pause and listen, the candidate’s avatar may continue: “I also noticed that you care a lot about science, technology, and space exploration – I do too, and I’m planning on increasing NASA’s budget by 20% next year. Let’s go to Mars!”

“I’d really appreciate your vote. Every vote and every dollar counts. Do you mind flicking me a $1 sticker to show your support?”

Fun times ahead.

Sarah Baughman: Another EdTech success story

Casual photo of Sarah Baughman.

SARAH BAUGHMAN

EdTech prepared her for new career

Boise State’s EdTech master’s program prepared Sarah Baughman very well for employment at GoReact, a company whose product enables teachers to insert instructive comments on student video presentations.

She says she’s “grateful to have the knowledge of evaluation, instructional design, course development, and multimedia creation” because it is just what she needs to create training materials, help documentation, and tutorial videos, and product evaluation. And, because she knows American Sign Language, she also provides tech support for ASL teachers and students.

Because of the visual nature of ASL, even face to face classes turn in video assignments, says Baughman. And That is why this tool lends itself so perfectly to the teaching and learning of ASL and other presentation skills.

Recent research at Boise State University showed that all teachers who used GoReact found it efficient, effective, and enjoyable to use. GoReact helped them cut grading time in half. Seventy percent of students found it to be an effective learning tool.

GoReact was created by a university professor who suffered through too many boring presentations, so he decided there had to be a better way to teach people to present information effectively.

Baughman had worked a graduate assistant in EdTech until getting the job at GoReact last April.  She is finishing her portfolio this semester while finishing her MET degree. She is on track to graduate next month.

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